Microsoft Enterprise Agreement True-Up

Document created by peter.verwulgen@snowsoftware.com Employee on Apr 7, 2017
Version 1Show Document
  • View in full screen mode

If you are a Microsoft Enterprise Agreement (EA) customer you will probably already appreciate the advantages it gives you with regard to licensing flexibility when you deploy new hardware and software. But, as it is a trust-based contract, it requires certain commitments from your end.

Specifically, you have to inventory new hardware and software deployed since the last anniversary to meet your requirements. You then need to send to Microsoft one of the following:

A statement declaring no change to qualified hardware/software since the last anniversary

A true-up order for any increase in qualified hardware/software since the last anniversary

What needs to be trued-up?

You need to account for any increase in qualified desktops, qualified users, and/or additional products run since the last anniversary. For:

Qualified desktops - Office suites, Windows (OS upgrade and MDOP) and CAL suites (Core/ECAL)

Qualified Users -  CAL (Core/ECAL)

Enterprise Products for desktops/users must have equal quantities across all components. E.g. If the initial order was for Office, Windows and CAL and now 200 Users are being added via true-up, the true-up order must have equal quantities; i.e. 200 Office + 200 Windows + 200 CAL.

This inventory needs to be carried out even if you have reduced your desktops and/or users. This will ensure that for products like SQL, which are not licensed per desktop, any growth will be captured.

What do you need to count?

According to Microsoft, all devices included in the EA must be inventoried as part of the true-up process, including all servers, computers (desktops, laptops, and terminals) and mobile devices that use Microsoft-licensed software.

In addition, the following elements must be inventoried:

The number of qualified desktops, including the date they were put into service

The number of qualified users if counting core CAL or ECAL via user vs. device, including the date in which they became qualified users, via hire or assignment

The number of Operating System Environments (OSEs) running Microsoft software that has been licensed under the EA and when they were put in service - an OSE can be running on either a physical or virtual server

The number of CPUs running Microsoft software in each server, including the date they were put into service.

The number of qualifying underlying OS licenses on desktops, including the type of OS and date they were put into service.

The number of devices added which require Device CALs.  If counting via user vs. device, the number of users added for which User CALs are required. 

The number of actual servers requiring access to external users (e.g., supporting internet sites), including the date which that external access was allowed.

4 people found this helpful

Attachments

    Outcomes